MEDIAS

COMMUNICATION   |  JOURNALISM  |   MEDIAS  |  MOVING IMAGE 

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PARADE – Publication and Research in Art, Architectures, Design and Environments, seeks to explore the relationships between the built environment and the following disciplines:

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COMMUNICATION

Buildings speak. We read the city as text. Architecture is seen as a semiotic construct. We interact and interpret our bodies’ movements and behaviours in physical settings every day. We also represent our built environment in visual forms – on TV, in films, in poetry and prose.  Politicians and rulers have seen their cities and houses as ‘messages’ to their people and their enemies since time immemorial. People have written letters from one place to another since the time of the ancients. We now communicate our feelings of place through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and multiple other modes of communication. There is clearly a history here. What is the future?

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JOURNALISM

During the Arab Spring or the siege of Aleppo, news from and about places was not only important for broadcasters, it was essential to generating political action for the people caught in places of danger. Journalists visit places long forgotten, sites of danger, cities of terror and feed distant publics with the images, information and hopes of those places. Journalism can however, also construct false images of places. It can – and has – dramatized and sometimes demonized cities and the peoples in them. It has ‘created’ locations of tourist interest and ridiculed some into decline. It also had its own subsections intrinsically linked to places and the buildings in them –architecture, cities, tourism… Its links to the built environment are both diverse and multiple. This programme seeks to explore them more.

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NEW MEDIAS  & TECHNOLOGIES

Today we are fully accustomed to new medias as part of our lives and as integral to the ways we engage with, present and discuss the built environment. Whether through blogs, social media or other web-based technologies that permit us to see physical places in other parts of the world in real time, or whether we are using apps to navigate the city we are physically in, the relationship between these medias and the built environment is fully embedded. The smart city, digital city and intelligent city are all other manifestations of it. If we expand our definition of ‘medias’ to phenomena such as online gaming, augmented and virtual reality, the very notion of ‘inhabiting’ physical space is potentially in revolution. The elimination of space and time once offered by the internet can potentially be more visceral than we ever imagined in the early days of the technologies and media we now use today, everyday.

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MOVING IMAGE – FILM-TV-VIDEO-ANIMATION

The city symphony is perhaps the most celebrated way in which film has engaged with the built environments – the early 20th century obsession with the phenomenon of mass urbanisation and the establishment of the new medium being the catalyst for experiments in both arenas. Later, video artists would play with, distort and create physical settings in related ways whilst TV would tend to – but not always – present the built environment on its own terms, as a backdrop. With the emergence of new technologies for creating and presenting the moving image and physical space – digital production, animation and more – these relationships are more nuanced and unstable than ever. This programme welcomes scholars, artists and filmmakers to explore these ideas with an eye to the future and an understanding of the past.

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MORE INFORMATION: CONFERENCE  |  JOURNAL  |  ARTICLE SUBMISSIONS

OTHER CATEGORIES:  ART  |  DESIGN  |  ENVIRONMENTS  |  ARCHITECTURES

AMPS PARTNERSHIPS:  NETWORK

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Images: Karen Elliot, Pixabay, Pexel